Beavers

Life inside the digital media death spiral can be a drag, but it’s is never so gruesome that we can’t have a laugh at the expense of others.

In early January, The Beaver, Canada’s second oldest continuously-published magazine, announced a name chage. Citing diminished reader interest — and the frequency with which it runs afoul of internet porn filters — the Beaver will relaunch this March as Canada’s History, a name we hope has no unintended double meanings. As any 14-year-old boy will tell you, beaver isn’t just a magazine about Canada’s glorious days gone by, it’s slang for female genitalia.

Originally launched in 1920 by fur traders, Canada’s History hopes that by rebranding and embracing Web publishing they can swell their market share and reconnect with those who were scared away. Good luck getting the blood flowing again.

Peak circulation for The Beaver was just 45,000 to 50,000 for the bi-monthly publication. However, while it seems highly improbable that ‘Canada History’ can maintain the same vigor that was generated by the announcement of the name change, all the linkback traffic won’t hurt.

In the meantime, copywriters and editors across the Web have outdone themselves coming up with zingers that capitalize on the double entendre. Below we’ve collected some of the best headlines:

It’s clear that English ink jockeys had the most fun with this one, but the Australians and Canadians weren’t far behind. Vote for your favorites in the comments section below.

Image via: Creative Commons